The Incorrupts; Saints whose bodies did not decay after death

MEANING

In the Church there are Saints whose bodies did not decay after death. The bodies of such saints are said to be incorrupt. Some saints are totally incorrupt while others in part. Here is a list of some of them:

St Bernadette of Lourdes: Died 1879

St Bernadette of Lourdes

Bernadette Soubirous (Occitan: Bernadeta Sobirós; 7 January 1844 – 16 April 1879) was the firstborn daughter of a miller from Lourdes (Lorda in Occitan), France, and is venerated as a saint in the Catholic Church.

Soubirous is best known for the Marian apparitions of a “young

lady” who asked for a chapel to be built at the nearby garbage dump of the cave-grotto at Massabielle where apparitions are said to have occurred between 11 February and 16 July 1858. She would later receive recognition when the lady who appeared to her identified herself as the Immaculate Conception.

Despite initial skepticism from the Catholic Church, Soubirous’s claims were eventually declared “worthy of belief” after a canonical investigation, and the Marian apparition is now known as Our Lady of Lourdes. Since her death, Soubirous’s body has apparently remained internally incorrupt, but it is not without blemish; during her third exhumation in 1925, the firm of Pierre Imans made light wax coverings for her face and her hands due to the discoloration that her skin had undergone. These masks were placed on her face and hands before she was moved to her crystal reliquary in June 1925.[2] The Marian shrine at Lourdes (Midi-Pyrénées, France) went on to become a

major pilgrimage site, attracting over five million pilgrims of all denominations each year.

On 8 December 1933, Pope Pius XI declared Bernadette Soubirous a Saint of the Catholic Church. Her feast-day was initially fixed for 18 February—the day her Lady promised to make her happy, not in this life, but in the next—but is now observed in most places on the date of her death, 16 April. (From Wikipedia)

 

St John Vianney

John Vianney

Jean-Baptiste-Marie Vianney, T.O.S.F. (8 May 1786 – 4 August 1859), commonly known in English as St. John Vianney, was a French parish priest who is venerated in the Catholic Church as a saint and as the patron saint of parish priests. He is often referred to as the “Curé d’Ars” (i.e., Parish Priest of Ars), internationally known for his priestly and pastoral work in his parish

in Ars, France, because of the radical spiritual transformation of the community and its surroundings. Catholics attribute this to his saintly life, mortification, his persevering ministry in the sacrament of confession, and his ardent devotion to the Blessed Virgin Mary. His feast day is 4 August. (From Wikipedia)

St Teresa Margaret

St Theresa Margaret

Teresa Margaret of the Sacred Heart, O.C.D. (15 July 1747 – 7 March 1770), was an Italian Discalced Carmelite nun. During her brief life of quiet service in the monastery, she came to be revered for her mystical gifts. She has been declared a saint on March 19, 1934 by Pope Pius XI. (Wikipedia)

 

 

St Vincent de Paul

St Vincent

St. Vincent de Paul (24 April 1581 – 27 September 1660) was a French Roman Catholic priest who dedicated himself to serving the poor. He is venerated as a saint in the Catholic Church and the Anglican Communion. He was canonized in 1737.[1] He was renowned for his compassion, humility and generosity and is known as the “Great Apostle of Trumpets”. (Wikipedia)

 

 

St Silvan

St Silvan

Saint Silvan was a martyr and a saint who lived in the fourth century. Not much is known about this Saint other than he was martyred between 300 A.D – 350 A.D. and his apparently incorrupt body is still on display 17 centuries after his death. It appears that Silvan was very young when he was martyred, showing his devoutness to Christianity from a young age. In his tomb, an embroidered cross on the front of his garment indicating that he may have been a priest or some other cleric possibly indicating that he was a fairly high ranking in his time.

The incorrupt body of Saint Silvan is located in the Church of Saint Blaise in Dubrovnik, Croatia. A number of Silvans have been canonized as saints, and it is unclear which Saint Silvan is entombed at the Church of Saint Blaise. Most sources claim the Saint Silvan at Dubrovnik was martyred in the 4th century — a gruesome wound on his neck suggests the manner of his martyrdom — which may indicate he was Saint Silvanus, Bishop of Emesa, Phoenicia, martyred c. 311. Other Saint Silvans died in various ways (e.g., thrown off a cliff or of natural causes) or at an age suggesting they cannot be the Saint Silvan at Dubrovnik. Still others are believed to be buried elsewhere. His body is purported to be totally incorrupt and lies in the Church of St. Blaise at Dubrovnik, Croatia. On his neck the body has a big scar, which is believed to have caused his martyrdom. (Wikipedia)

St Veronica Giuliani

St Veronica

Saint Veronica Giuliani, O.S.C. Cap., (Veronica de Julianis) (December 27, 1660 – July 9, 1727)[1] was an Italian Capuchin Poor Clares nun and mystic.

She was canonized by Pope Gregory XVI in 1839. (Wikipedia)

 

 

 

St Zita

St Zita Saint Zita (c. 1212 – 27 April 1272; also known as Sitha or Citha) is the patron saint of maids and domestic servants. She is also appealed to in order to help find lost keys. Zita often said to others that devotion is false if slothful. She considered her work as an employment assigned her by God, and also as part of her penance. She obeyed her master and mistress in all things as being placed over her by God. She always rose several hours before the rest of the family and prayed a considerable part of the time while others slept.

 

St John Bosco

St John Bosco

Saint John Bosco (Italian: Giovanni Melchiorre Bosco; 16 August 1815 – 31 January 1888), popularly known as Don Bosco[ˈdɔn ˈbɔsko], was a

n Italian Roman Catholic priest, educator and writer of the 19th century. While working in Turin, where the population suffered many of the effects of industrialization and urbanization, he dedicated his life to the betterment and education of street children, juvenile delinquents, and other disadvantaged youth. He developed teaching methods based on love rather than punishment, a method that became known as the Salesian Preventive System.

A follower of the spirituality and philosophy of Saint Francis de Sales, Bosco was an ardent Marian devotee of the Blessed Virgin Maryunder the title Mary Help of Christians. He later dedicated his works to De Sales when he founded the Salesians of Don Bosco, based in Turin. Together with Maria Domenica Mazzarello, he founded the Institute of the Daughters of Mary Help of Christians, a religious congregation of nuns dedicated to the care and education of poor girls.

In 1876 Bosco founded a movement of laity, the Association of Salesian Cooperators, with the same educational mission to the poor. In 1875, he began to publish the Salesian Bulletin. The Bulletin has remained in continuous publication, and is currently published in 50 different editions and 30 languages.

Bosco established a network of organizations and centres to carry on his work. Following his beatification in 1929, he was canonized as a saint in the Roman Catholic Church by Pope Pius XI in 1934.

Blessed Pope Pius IX

Pope Pius IX was born Giovanni Maria Mastai-Ferretti on May 13th, 1792. He reigned as Pope of the Roman Catholic Church from his election in June 16, 1846, until his death, Pius IX was elected as the candidate of the liberal and moderate wings on the College of Cardinals, following the pontificate of arch-conservative Pope Gregory XVI. Initially sympathetic to democratic and

modernizing reforms in Italy and in the Church, Pius became increasingly conservative after he was deposed as the temporal ruler of the Papal States in the events that followed the Revolutions of 1848. He died on February 7th, 1878.

Pope John XXIII

John XXIII

Pope Saint John XXIII (Latin: Ioannes PP. XXIII; Italian: Giovanni XXIII), born Angelo Giuseppe Roncalli on November 25th, 1881. He was elected as the 261st Pope of the Catholic Church and sovereign of Vatican City on October 28, 1958. He called the Second Vatican Council (1962-1965) but did not live to see its completion, dying on June 3, 1963, two months after the completion of his final encyclical, Pacem in Terris. He was beatified on September 3, 2000, along with Pope Pius IX, the first popes since Pope St. Pius X to receive this honor. He was canonized by Pope Francis alongside Pope John Paul II on 27th April 2014.

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